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BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

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Many of you are looking for new jobs. But are you trying everything you can to attract your dream opportunities and employers? Are you doing more than just applying to job ads online?

I talk a lot about creating content and have spoken to several experts about how to do that consistently on my live-streaming show Inside Scoop. But my conversation with executive coach and career strategist, Susan Peppercorn, was a more in depth look at using content to strategically attract the professional opportunities you want.

Here are four ways to create content to impress potential employers.

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BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”
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What is it about the videos you watch while scrolling social media, that makes you stop and watch? A better question is: How can you create a video that makes others stop and watch?

Recently, chef, author, mom, and TV host, Nikki Dinki joined me on my live-streaming show Inside Scoop to share her secrets on making buzzworthy videos and chat about her newest cookbook, More Veggies Please!

More Veggies Please! is a cookbook targeted towards families, but is for everyone!

“It’s our classic American staples, your mac and cheeses, your chicken nuggets, your chicken tenders, your meatloaf, with a surprising veggie twist. It’s really a way to just get more variety of vegetables in your diet, while still having things like queso,” Nikki explained.

This is Nikki’s second cookbook. Her first was Meat on the Side. So you might say, vegetables are her brand. We first met when I was a senior health producer for Fox News and interviewed her about the first book. I’ve been following her journey ever since and it’s her videos that have kept me engaged. So I wanted to know her strategy.

 

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BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

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We’ve all gotten used to living our lives on video over the past year. And video is here to stay, so if you want to grow your business or connect with your audience, this is a medium you need to master.

I spoke with videographer and producer Kristian Golick on my live-streaming show “Inside Scoop” about common questions about doing video — and how you can become a pro.

Why video?

As a former TV producer, I’ve been spreading the word about video for years. Kristian and I talked about one element of creating video that  is key: It creates a connection between you and the viewer. Just like we all feel like we know our favorite TV reporters or movie stars, your audience can get to know you through your videos.

Kristian knows from personal experience how powerful this connection can be. Kristian has been a videographer for years, creating videos from business as well as wedding films. But he never got in front of the camera himself until 2018, when he created a short video to address a common question among his clients about raw footage and what to do with it.

When he sent it to his clients, they expressed how much it helped them get to know him as a person. In fact, the feedback from that video was so positive he closed $10,000 in business and he’s continued to create video content ever since!

What content should I be creating?

Kristian says that his first video taught him an important lesson about content. Think about the questions that you get most often, then create videos addressing those. 

Should I do live or pre-recorded videos?

While there are pros and cons to both live and pre-recorded videos, Kristian and I both say that live videos can save you time (and energy) once you get the hang of them. Live videos help you get over perfectionism, too. Plus, they keep you accountable, since if you said you’re going live at a certain time, you’ve got to stick to it! Of course, you can always re-use your recorded live content. 

That’s what I do with my live-streaming show Inside Scoop. Kristian and I did this interview and now as you can see I’m using the content now in a different way – as a blog post. 

What set-up should I use?

Kristian says you don’t have to spend a lot of money to create a set-up that will make your videos look professional. He uses a light from Amazon that cost about $100, and placed it above him and angled down. He also taped a piece of wax paper to soften the light. The placement of the light is key to avoiding glare on his glasses, Kristian explained. (Make sure you check out the video we did together here so you can see his explanation.) 

Don’t worry about creating a set-up that looks too polished — you don’t want people to think your videos are ads, after all!

What should my background be?

Like me, Kristian is not a fan of Zoom backgrounds. He either makes sure to have a clean, neat real background, or he uses a green screen if he needs to replace his backdrop. The green screen is key, Kristian said, because it ensures the background is consistent and doesn’t cut off your ear or hands, which often happens with Zoom backgrounds. 

Where should I post my videos?

Kristian has two suggestions. The first is that you should post where you already have the most audience engagement. If that’s Instagram, go for Instagram. If that’s Facebook, post there.

Kristian’s second suggestion is that you should match your content to the platform. Tutorial-type videos, for example, work best on YouTube. But if you want to do shorter videos, try Instagram Stories. 

How often should I post?

Consistency is key. If you do Instagram stories, try a short video every day. For YouTube, post once a week. When people know to expect content from you, they’ll be more likely to tune in and get to know you. (That’s why I host Inside Scoop every week!).

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BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

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BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

Imagine having about ten seconds to decide to keep or toss an email. Hundreds of emails. That’s what a typical day is like for a producer or editor.

I used to get so many emails in my inbox when I was a senior producer at Fox News Channel and when I worked in local news in New York City as well. It was impossible to look at them all. So they had to really catch my attention and make me want to find out more.

There were some that popped up over and over again and made me cringe. Don’t make the mistake of sending one of these subject lines to a journalist — she will likely hit delete immediately.

 

Bad Subject Line #1: What stories are you working on?

Ugh, this is a common mistake. You think you’re being inquisitive and conversational but instead you are inadvertently rubbing a producer the wrong way with this subject line. Here’s why — it makes them do all the work! 

Editors and producers would have to stop, think about it, and write you back. Plus, they might not even know who you are. Journalists just don’t have time to do an audit of all the stories they’re working on.

Instead, make your offer. Tell the journalist how you can help them do their job better. Is it that you are an expert in Jamaican cooking and you have a few simple recipes to share for the cold winter months? Or maybe you’re a publicist and you have several experts to share. Give up the goods! Show the producer what you can do to help them lighten their load, don’t add to it.

 

Bad Subject Line #2: Can I pitch you?

Don’t ask to pitch – because you could have wasted your one shot at getting the person’s attention. When I saw emails with this subject line, I had no idea what was inside – it didn’t give me one detail. So I would just pass it by.

Instead, be catchy. Lay out your topic in a compelling way. Watch some TV news shows to get this tactic down. You know right before they go to commercial how they say “Coming up after the break” and go into what’s still to come? Well, those are called teases and they are meant to whet your appetite and keep you watching.

Do the same with your subject line. Make me want to find out more about what you’re offering. Also take a look at magazine and newspaper headlines for inspiration. 

 

Bad Subject Line #3: Can I call you about this?

No, because journalists just don’t have time to talk to you on the phone — especially when you haven’t made it clear what you’re pitching.  So unless they know what they’re going to get from you, the answer is no.

Instead, I loved when pitches gave me a glimpse. Show the journalist what you as an expert can give their audience. The one question you should be answering with your pitch is “why do I care?” And that “I” is the producer or editor who is sitting in the place of her audience. So why does that audience care about what you have to say?

 

Bad Subject Line #4 : Anything including “breakthrough” or other over-the-top claim

While obviously something described as “breakthrough” might have initially gotten my attention, my BS meter is highly calibrated. People were always trying to dupe me this way to get media coverage. I always knew in seconds whether the person pitching me actually had the goods. So you better be sure you do. Because fool me once…and that’s it. Make a big claim, and fail to deliver, and journalists will no longer take your pitches seriously.

Instead, deliver on your promise. 

Make sure whatever it is that you choose to send to a journalist is rock-solid information. Don’t go all over the top or outlandish to get their attention if you can’t deliver. Be careful with how you frame your stories because more than just getting media exposure you want to develop real relationships with members of the media.

How do you think producers find recurring guests? They keep going back to the experts that deliver quality content over and over again.

BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.

BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

One of the questions I’m asked the most when people find out I’ve spent nearly 20 years as a television producer is “How do I get on TV?” 

It’s not a simple answer. 

But one of the things I always ask is “what are you producing yourself?”  

You have to be your own producer and create content the media cares about. That’s step one! 

I recently saw my friend Kate Hanley on her local news station talking all about her podcast, “How to Be a Better Person” so I had to talk to her about how she got booked. 

We shot this video of our conversation where she talks all about how it happened. 

Kate has a background in media as a journalist who has written for national magazines including Real Simple, Parents, and Martha Stewart’s Whole Living.

Now as an author and podcast host she’s tasked with getting the word out about her expertise. Here’s how she did it: 

Making the Connection..

Kate lives in Providence, RI, and she heard of a new morning show that she thought might be looking for pitches. She posted in a local networking group to see if anyone had a contact, and a connection suggested reaching out to a producer over social media.

People who work in media often have their email address in their bio — and that’s because they want you to pitch them.

“That’s one thing that we have to just tell ourselves is that we’re actually helping people do their jobs by pitching them,” Kate says. 

 

Make your pitch timely.

One of the elements of a well-written pitch is the “hook.” Why is this relevant right now? 

Kate took this into consideration when she planned out her pitch. When Kate thinks of a pitch, she connects her ideas to current events or holidays.

“I think I just Googled ‘crazy national holidays’,” Kate says of one pitch. “There were all these wacky days like Flip Flop Day and Hotdog Day. I noticed that there was Make a Difference Day was coming up, which perfectly aligned with How to Be a Better Person.”

By connecting your pitch to an upcoming event, producers feel more urgency when considering your idea. “Not only might they like that idea, but they’re going to need to act on it because that day’s coming up,” Kate says. 

 

Reuse and recycle.

One of the biggest mistakes people make when they start to pitch media is that they think they have to create completely new or different material for a pitch. Nope! Use all your content to feed your blog, your book, your podcast, your pitches. They all go hand in hand. You will taylor the ideas for each outlet but your ideas are your ideas. 

Kate’s lightbulb moment happened when she realized she didn’t need to be creating totally separate blog posts and pitches. She made a Google Drive account for organizing her ideas and realized that she had lots of great material that could be adapted and updated. 

“I found old pitches that I had written and blog posts that I had written and just stuff that I thought might be useful in a lot of different ways,” Kate says. “And I can go in there and really slice and dice.”

That doesn’t mean you should use the same posts and pitches over and over. Like Kate says, it’s important to customize your content and pitches to the outlet you’re pitching. 

You can watch the whole video here to hear all of Kate’s tips — including why writing thank you notes is the small gesture that an leaves an impression. 

And be sure to check out Kate’s podcast “How to Be a Better Person.” 

BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.

Photo by Gavin Whitner.

 

BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

 

Figure out your niche. 

Before you become an expert, you have to decide what you’re going to be an expert in. How can you figure that out? 

Ask yourself these two questions:  

  1. What are you always telling clients? 
  2. What are you always answering questions about? 

These are two good ways to tell where your expertise lies. 

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BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

Whenever I work with clients to help them pitch media better, look better on camera or set up a system to produce more of their own content, I always ask, “What are you producing now?” 

Common answers include: 

  • “A blog post every few months” 
  • “A video here or there”
  • “I did a FB Live once”

To be interesting to the media, to your potential clients and your current fans, you need to consistently create content. 

So how do you do it? 

With an editorial calendar, of course! 

This is a trick I’ve learned from nearly 20 years as a television producer. Everyone in the newsroom knew what stories were coming up in the next minute, five minutes, five days, five weeks, etc. Read more