Posts

I’ve been singing the praises of video for a long time. And the rise of remote work with the COVID-19 pandemic has opened up so many new opportunities to use video. (Check out my LinkedIn Learning course here all about how to set up your remote office for optimal productivity.) 

The biggest change is probably the popularity of Zoom — who among us hasn’t spent countless hours on Zoom since March 2020?!

“Zoom fatigue” is a buzzword we’re seeing everywhere now — and it’s one of the most common issues when it comes to incorporating video into your daily interactions with colleagues and clients. 

Sometimes everyone needs to be live on Zoom — and there are things you can do to make those meetings more productive.

Read more

When I was a senior health producer at Fox News Channel, I booked guest experts all the time. 

Sometimes experts rambled when the host wanted a short answer, and sometimes people didn’t give enough information.

To be a go-to media expert, you need to be able to deliver your content in a way that fits the situation. 

That means you have to be able to talk about your expertise within different time constraints. 

This is the core of my media prep plan that I teach my media-training clients.

Read more

You never know who is following you on social media.

For example, my friend Cassandra Sethi, a personal stylist, has an awesome Instagram for her business Next Level Wardrobe. She’s full of outfit ideas and tips for looking more polished. 

Read more

NEW COURSE: Want to learn more about how to adjust to working remotely? You can check out my new LinkedIn Learning course, Organizing Your Remote Office for Maximum Productivity. Click here for access! Click here for access!

If you want to learn more about how to adjust your career and work environment while working remotely, you can check out my LinkedIn Learning course, Organizing Your Remote Office for Maximum Productivity. It’s live now!

So many conferences have gone virtual because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read more

JOIN ME FOR “VIRTUAL MEETING PRO: Elevate your virtual presentation skills via video. With video meetings becoming the norm, it’s more important than ever to present well on camera. CLICK HERE to join my online training “Virtual Meeting Pro.”

Going live on social media is one of the best ways to engage your audience and show the world that you’re an expert. It helps you establish your credibility and increase your visibility. 

But lots of people don’t go live because they think they’re not ready or they don’t know how — and they’re missing out a big opportunity to connect with people. 

That’s why I get asked this question a lot: How do you go live on social media?

Read more

___

BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

___

Now that meetings and interviews are happening remotely, you’re probably rethinking how you present your ideas on camera. 

But have you thought about how you’re doing your makeup? 

Makeup might seem like a secondary concern, but it’s actually so important. Distracting makeup and clothes will take away from the main event – YOU!

Read more

JOIN ME FOR “VIRTUAL MEETING PRO: Elevate your virtual presentation skills via video. With video meetings becoming the norm, it’s more important than ever to present well on camera. CLICK HERE to join my online training “Virtual Meeting Pro.”

Are you getting sick of being on video calls? 

Now that so many more meetings are happening virtually, it can be hard not to feel overwhelmed. And that makes sense. 

Video calls require a lot more energy from you than talking in person because you have to be “on” all the time. You have to be engaged with the camera and concentrate more. 

Read more

BONUS FREEBIE: Do you want to know what the media is looking for and how to give it to them? Check out my free three-part video course How to Be a Media Magnet for my expert tips on how to become a pro at pitching and getting booked. 

Think you’re ready to be a media star?

Take the ultimate media-readiness challenge. It’s the one thing that you absolutely, no exceptions, must be able to do in order to kill it on TV or in print.

Be able to explain what you do and why it matters — to a fifth grader.

Yup.

Read more

BONUS FREEBIE: Do you want to know what the media is looking for and how to give it to them? Check out my free three-part video course How to Be a Media Magnet for my expert tips on how to become a pro at pitching and getting booked. 

We’ve all seen the news recently — the media is reporting on coronavirus (COVID-19) 24/7.

I worked in newsrooms for almost 20 years — I know how this works. Journalists are eager to find coronavirus stories, since it’s what everyone wants to know about. 

Read more

BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

Imagine having about ten seconds to decide to keep or toss an email. Hundreds of emails. That’s what a typical day is like for a producer or editor.

I used to get so many emails in my inbox when I was a senior producer at Fox News Channel and when I worked in local news in New York City as well. It was impossible to look at them all. So they had to really catch my attention and make me want to find out more.

There were some that popped up over and over again and made me cringe. Don’t make the mistake of sending one of these subject lines to a journalist — she will likely hit delete immediately.

 

Bad Subject Line #1: What stories are you working on?

Ugh, this is a common mistake. You think you’re being inquisitive and conversational but instead you are inadvertently rubbing a producer the wrong way with this subject line. Here’s why — it makes them do all the work! 

Editors and producers would have to stop, think about it, and write you back. Plus, they might not even know who you are. Journalists just don’t have time to do an audit of all the stories they’re working on.

Instead, make your offer. Tell the journalist how you can help them do their job better. Is it that you are an expert in Jamaican cooking and you have a few simple recipes to share for the cold winter months? Or maybe you’re a publicist and you have several experts to share. Give up the goods! Show the producer what you can do to help them lighten their load, don’t add to it.

 

Bad Subject Line #2: Can I pitch you?

Don’t ask to pitch – because you could have wasted your one shot at getting the person’s attention. When I saw emails with this subject line, I had no idea what was inside – it didn’t give me one detail. So I would just pass it by.

Instead, be catchy. Lay out your topic in a compelling way. Watch some TV news shows to get this tactic down. You know right before they go to commercial how they say “Coming up after the break” and go into what’s still to come? Well, those are called teases and they are meant to whet your appetite and keep you watching.

Do the same with your subject line. Make me want to find out more about what you’re offering. Also take a look at magazine and newspaper headlines for inspiration. 

 

Bad Subject Line #3: Can I call you about this?

No, because journalists just don’t have time to talk to you on the phone — especially when you haven’t made it clear what you’re pitching.  So unless they know what they’re going to get from you, the answer is no.

Instead, I loved when pitches gave me a glimpse. Show the journalist what you as an expert can give their audience. The one question you should be answering with your pitch is “why do I care?” And that “I” is the producer or editor who is sitting in the place of her audience. So why does that audience care about what you have to say?

 

Bad Subject Line #4 : Anything including “breakthrough” or other over-the-top claim

While obviously something described as “breakthrough” might have initially gotten my attention, my BS meter is highly calibrated. People were always trying to dupe me this way to get media coverage. I always knew in seconds whether the person pitching me actually had the goods. So you better be sure you do. Because fool me once…and that’s it. Make a big claim, and fail to deliver, and journalists will no longer take your pitches seriously.

Instead, deliver on your promise. 

Make sure whatever it is that you choose to send to a journalist is rock-solid information. Don’t go all over the top or outlandish to get their attention if you can’t deliver. Be careful with how you frame your stories because more than just getting media exposure you want to develop real relationships with members of the media.

How do you think producers find recurring guests? They keep going back to the experts that deliver quality content over and over again.

BONUS FREEBIE: Your message deserves the media’s attention. So how do you get out there in a bigger way? I’ve got you covered. CLICK HERE to grab my free “Checklist to Become a Go-To Media Expert.”

This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links.